"Everested" versus "vEverested"

Hey all.

I’ve spotted this article on Zwift’s main site: All About vEveresting | Zwift

…but I’m left with some questions.

It’s my understanding you could get the “Everested” Zwift achievement badge with any activity, regardless of trainer difficulty setting: 0% on a smart trainer, or a full-on “dumb” trainer, as long as you climb 8,848m in one Zwift activity.

Is that correct?

“vEverested” seems tracked by an outside org, and for that you need to follow some verification, ensure trainer is on 100% etc.

“Everested” Zwift achievement badge = can be done on any trainer in one ride.

“vEverested” = all in one go according to vEvereste rules.

EDIT: to fix my mistake.

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OK, that leaves me a bit confused.

I completed the “Everest Challenge”, unlocked both the Emonda, and Concept Z1. Clearly, I’ve climbed Everest, several times.

I have no “Everested” badge. Account glitch?

To get the ‘Everested’ badge you have to climb the equivalent of Mt. Everest is a single ride. This is about 8.5 times up AdZ.

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Guess what: I was wrong.

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Thanks guys.

Maybe a suggestion for the Zwift web-publishers: update the Zwift website to clarify the difference between “Everesting” and “vEveresting”…?

Having read the article it seems pretty clear to me.

Gerrie must have been having a senior moment.

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I disagree with this.

The page makes it clear what vEveresting requires. It doesn’t make a clear distinction between that and Everesting which you can still achieve on sub-100% trainer difficulty, without external verification - do a single ride gaining 8,848m (even with a dumb trainer) and you get the “Everesting” badge in Zwift.

For what it’s worth, vEveresting is not a ‘Zwift’ thing. It is tracked by an independent group. Only the Everesting badge is a Zwift construct.

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Yep, Zwift is entitled to talk about in game Everesting.

The criteria required for vEveresting is not of their concern and therefore i wouldn’t expect them to put details of this.

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I did not ride this morning so the brain is not awake. LOL

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Do you have this backward? Zwift are the ones who award the Everesting badge, so the details of this should be important to them. vEveresting is not a Zwift thing, so they shouldn’t be concerned with the details of this (but they could certainly talk about it if they want to.)

As near as I can tell, though, the only major differences between the two are that vEveresting requires that TD be at 100% and that you arrange it ahead of time with the vEveresting folks so that the verification can be done. (Maybe there is a weigh-in requirement, too?)

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Yeah, that was what I was trying to communicate - Zwift’s page is titled “vEveresting” and goes into detail about that, not their own “Everesting” badge.

Zwift don’t need a whole page dedicated to “vEveresting” but it is nice that they give you the detail, especially that “vEveresting” is such a big achievement and you don’t want to get it wrong.

There is no need to explain everesing apart for then one picture I posted.

But if you Everest all in 1 go, on a dumb trainer, you will not eEverest but you will zEverest and on your first Everest, you get the Emonda bike.

I propose Everesting in one go, on Zwift, be called zEversting (obtain the badge) and you may or may not qualify for officially Everesting.

Why not. Some Dumb trainers are more accurate than some smart trainers. :rofl:

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Official Everesting is the outdoor one so zEveresting a priori does not qualify. (Ok, unless you have Zwift running while riding outdoors…)

Official vEveresting is the indoor one, so throwing zEveresting into the mix seems a good opportunity to establish eEveresting as the umbrella term (rEverestings have been approved for a while now).

(Postscript: if Zwift and RGT get their act together, that would be four achievements for a single consumer actvity. Neoliberalism doesn’t get any better than that. :rofl:)

The Everesting website seems to include indoor/online Everesting as counting officially:
“The concept of Everesting is fiendishly simple: Pick any hill, anywhere in the world and complete repeats of it in a single activity until you climb 8,848m – the equivalent height of Mt Everest. Complete the challenge on a bike, on foot, or online, and you’ll find your name in the Hall of Fame”.

It is true that it has to be done all in one ride and at 100% trainer difficulty.

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Ok. I think it must have changed at some point, I think at least around the beginning of the plague, online activities did not count yet.