Wahoo kickr core vs wahoo kickr snap

Hi, is somebody can tell me what are the advantages / inconveniences of Wahoo Kickr snap vs Wahoo Kick core ? Of course price and what else?
Thanks for your help.

Direct drive is infinitely better than wheel-on. More accurate power readings, no slipping, higher wattage, no wear on your tire.

If you train frequently with a wheel-on trainer, you will want a second wheel with a special trainer tire, so you don’t mess up your outdoor tire. Switching wheels is actually more of a nuisance than just taking a wheel off and mounting your bike on a direct drive trainer.

A wheel-on trainer only makes sense if you train with it infrequently or you have a limited budget.

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The Snap is wheel-on. The Core is direct drive.

There is also the factor of the noise generated. Wheel-on trainers like the Snap are significantly noisier than direct-drive trainers, by their very nature.

For full disclosure, I have never used the Snap or Core, but I spent much time on a wheel-on trainer last century :grin:, and now use a KICKR 18 about ten hours a week. There’s no way I could use a wheel-on in my apartment without making enemies of my neighbours, but the KICKR (which is very similar to the Core, in many respects) is very quiet indeed.

I agree with Jim, the only reason I’d choose the Snap would be for financial reasons.

I started with a Snap but if you are Zwifting regularly then what Jim_Matttson replied is correct. The only “advantage” that a Snap has over the KICKR / CORE is that if your bike cassette is different from the cassette on your KICKR then the Snap will not care. My wife who does not Zwift but just wanted to ride indoors for 30 minutes a few times a week during the winter uses her recreational bike on the Snap (it has Altus 9 speed).