Experienced cyclist getting saddle sores on Zwift


(Michael) #1

Hi,

Does anybody else only get saddle sores riding indoors?

I’ve been riding for almost 30 years, been professionally bike fitted periodically, and wear Assos bib shorts with chamois cream, but I continually get saddle sores and inflammation when I Zwift.

I do not have this problem at all when riding outdoors. I don’t even need chamois cream when riding outdoors.

I do sweat a lot, despite using multiple fans when Zwifting, and I’m thinking the excessive amounts of sweat my chamois absorbs could be causing the problem. I also make sure I change position regularly and get out of the saddle.

Does anybody else experience this problem and what have you done to alleviate the problem?


(Daren) #2

Not something I’ve experienced myself, so unfortunately I can’t give any first-hand advice.

But I think you’re right that sweat could be a big factor. Outside the airflow covers your whole body, but when you’re indoors it’s only where your fans are pointed. Perhaps you could point a fan more directly at that area, to help evaporate the moisture more effectively.

Are you using the same bike and position indoors as you do outdoors? If not, that might be the issue, and you should check your positioning. (Same saddle too.)

Fresh shorts every ride.


(Michael) #3

Yep, same bike Daren. Good idea regarding the crotch fan too :joy:


(Tomas) #4

Riding indoors is more intense,you dont get out of the saddle as much as outdoors i think,i have had problem with numbness,tried different saddles for ex ISM but have settled with a cheap one from a local supermarket that works ok! ISM did not gave numness but terrible saddle sores…


(2 RollingStoned) #5

With outdoor riding the bike, and therefore the saddle, moves underneath you to some degree. With indoor training that is negligible to nil with many setups. This, combined with the added sweat may be the cause. I have the Tacx Neo which gives a little bit this way and I haven’t any issues. Good luck!


(Kevin) #6

I’ve found I have to consciously force myself out of the saddle frequently to prevent saddle sores on the trainer. I have less of an issue on the road because I naturally get out of the saddle more frequently. I also use both Chamois Butt’r on my shorts and glide on my skin and that helps as well.

Good luck!


(Jim) #7

I found that a rocker plate really helped to mitigate my saddle sores.


(Ales Susnik [VISION] (B)) #8

Raise the front of your bike between 0,1 to 1 cm, so the position takes wind into account as you would be riding outside. That will change your overall position.

Do you wear bibs or shorts? I only wear shorts, which are folded, so they are really low (bellow my hips almost, so i sweat less, for indoor riding with 2 fans on the floor which blow air into my legs up to my waist so it dries me. Helps me 90%.


(Dan) #9

i force myself to stand for a minute every 5-10 minutes, and try to shift forward and back on the saddle as the ride goes on. so easy to forget! i’ve also experimented with different seats, though the jury is out how much it affects this. haven’t yet gone to chamois creme, but thinking about it.

definitely fresh shorts every ride - jock itch is for real, and can cause sores.

shorts off immediately after riding, shower, then some drying powder.

good luck, it sucks!


(James Bongard) #10

I do as well. Sit slightly crooked on the bike, outside the bike leans ever so slightly to compensate but indoors the bike sits perfectly straight so I sit differently on the saddle and that causes some rubbing.


(Zach Johnston) #11

Since we are all adults and talking about our junk getting torn up from riding and I have no shame…

Im circumcised and since starting Fondo’s in October, that particular area gets chaffed and while not painful during the event (or even noticed) dude it is an absolute horror show to see that part of you bleeding and forget getting in the shower without covering it.

If you’ve read this far and survived, no chamois cream or body glide has prevented the damage, and Ive currently been using a few of the square 7/8" inch bandaids to cover the area since regular ones will just fall off. But as you can imagine…taking those ultra grippy bandaids off afterwards is not pleasant either.

So yea. I tried googling using a variety of terms and lets just say Ive not found an athletically oriented solution.


(G odmother Fox-Neo2) #12

this +1 …
give a “rocker plate” a try … you can build some really cheap/basic version - DIY, just to test if it really works for you …


(Michael) #13

Thanks for all the suggestions.

I’ve got some Glide and that seems to be doing the trick.


(_) #14

Not mentioned yet, a recumbent is a great option for those partial to saddle sores, sore butt, numb ■■■■, etc… :slight_smile: especially as a winter indoor activity. good luck putting out as much power on a recumbent but the comfort and workout is amazing. Despite having to pee every 30 minutes your balls will love you.


(Señor) #15

+1 for getting more motion on your trainer. I did not want to get a rocker plate. My Hammer is on a thick yoga mat. I just retracted the feet on the support legs and that allows a bit of side to side movement. It has made a noticeable improvement. A friend with a Kickr put the trainer on some rubber gym tiles to allow it to rock slightly.

I also have a “taint fan”…a small one pointed up at my saddle, but it did not help keep me drier as much as just adding a second large fan in front of me.