Zwift Vs weight

(Paul) #41

Stephan,

Again, that is an incorrect assumption based on very inconsistent (BAD) data.

Are you trying to say no matter how many watts you put out and regardless of the weight you will arrive at the top at the same time? That is just ridiculous, everyone would have very similar times up the mountain and that is not the case.

I bet you could run 2 different Zwift accounts using the same power source with 2 different weights and arrive at the top of the mountain at different times. This is the test you should be doing. To also make it even better you would also capture the data using another device or app for comparison. You should also use the TT bike since you would get no drafting benefit.

You are trying to use a very inconstant wheel on trainer and you are trying to compare the 2 using perceive effort and HR from 2 different days, which is just bad testing/science.

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(Stephan Martel ZHR(F)) #42

Hello Paul, how are you? Are you still so courteous in your answers? Instead of putting words to my place and talking about it being ridiculous, just take a few deep breaths. Your way of letting us believe that we do not know anything and that on your side, you know the infuse science make me believe that you  should consider  to go to teach at MIT. For the rest, please could you abstain. Thank you

Bad data, bad trainer, bad perceive effort, bad assumption…

 

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(Tomas) #43

Stephan,please stop trolling this forum!

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(Paul) #44

Stephan,

Do this and come back with your results:

Run 2 different Zwift accounts using the same power source with 2 different weights and you will arrive at the top of the mountain at different times. This is the test you should be doing. To also make it even better you would also capture the data using another device or app for comparison. You should also use the TT bike since you would get no drafting benefit.

That is the only way to reliably test your “theory”.

And yes, your data was bad, just don’t know how you can’t see it.

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(Nigel ) #45

Time to unsubscribe from this thread. The topic starter’s brain is beyond help.

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(Stuart Thomson) #46

Dozens of posts on and we are still none the wiser as to what the null hypothesis is!

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(. ) #47

Try changing your weight to 105 KG on Zwift and then try it.

See how you get on with that.

The Zwift programme is set up so that height and weight is a factor against you.  Slimmer and smaller riders will go faster over a course than a heavy taller rider on the same bike and wheel set up.

In total I believe the difference is about 15 seconds over a 12 km course.

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(Stephan Martel ZHR(F)) #48

I have just realized 3 times the rise of « box hill » using 60 kg, 65 kg and 75 kg on my Zwift profile. I was riding at 300 watts on my Tacx trainer each times while using my Power Edge software live to compare… On the 3X climbs, how much do you think my power edge sensor got as a power difference ?

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(Andre Hufschmid) #49

@Stephan Martel:  Has it ever come to your mind that changing your weight within a workout may be suspicious to Zwift? Who does that except for a cheat. I think you’ve been flagged as a Cheat long time ago and Zwift presumes you’re 100Kg. Anyways, Zwift works perfectly fine.

However, to get this ongoing nowhere going discussion to an end, what is your conclusion? It is not quite clear what you’re saying so i have put a few possibilities together:

  1. No matter how hard you try or how much effort you put into your workout you always arrive with the same time on top of Alpe du Zwift?

  2. Or are you saying pushing 300Watts results in the same result no matter how much you weigh?

  3. Or are you saying Zwift manipulates your power? Why would they? What would they get by doing that? However, If you change your weight within a workout, that is a very suspicious behavior so Zwift might have same measurements installed to avoid cheating like that. Change your weigh before starting a workout and you will see that your results are way different.

 

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(wai loon) #50

Seems like the OP is suggesting that Zwift in-game power output is correlated with in-game weight. i.e. say a rider who inputs 100kg weight produces 300W; the same rider who inputs 90kg weight will somehow only able to produce 270W, essentially producing 3W/kg in both cases and thus arriving at the top of AdZ at almost same time. 

This of course doesn’t make sense. Try the extreme case: input 120kg weight and see if you can maintain 360W (or 50kg and thus limited to 150W) and still reach top of AdZ at same time. Assuming you are able to sustain same effort on all tests, no significant change in fitness (ability to maintain more/less wattage between tests) and no fault in your trainer power measurement. 

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