The stars that show up by your segments


(Shelley Russell) #1

I am a newbie.  Did the FTP text Sunday and started a training program to increase by FTP.  When I am doing my training and the segments you do I get gold stars for some, partial gold stars for others and none on some.  What does that mean?

 

Shelley Russell


(Tyler Shannon) #2

Hi Shelley, 

Welcome to Zwift!

Stars are awarded per segment. 

 

  • Full star means you completed the entire segment successfully. 

  • Partial star means you only successfully completed a portion of the segment

  • No star means you failed the entire segment 


(Zee Kryder) #3

Unfortunately, that isn’t totally true. If the wattage says 200 and you do something over like 221 average, it will say you failed the segment. Overachieving is not failure, but zwift thinks it is.


(Gerrie Delport) #4

Overachieving is a fail. The point of a training program is to stay in a certain prescribed Zone, that mean not going under or over. 


(Zee Kryder) #5

No, it isn’t a fail. It’s better than the goal. A star and a half would be good. 

But, it would be 10 times better if the segment ended and just said “avg watts 224”

 


(Tyler Shannon) #6

Hi Zee, 

 

Going over a segment is failing a segment. The segments are there to target specific things. As an example, if a segment were to ask for 75 RPM in order to work on your low cadence, and you did 95 RPM for the segment, you did not do better than the segment, you failed it.

 

 Some workouts are there to target specific muscle groups, where the wattage will help work on those groups. Going over negates the purpose of the workout. 


(Shelley Russell) #7

Tyler S. that brings me to another question.  When it changes segments is shows something like this “90-100 keep your cadence”.   But my Watts would be like 75, so when I get my cadence up, I get the red number and says power down.  What is more important to stay within the Watts or do what it says on the 90-100 cadence.  This is so confusing between cadence and watts.  Help please.

Thank you

Shelley


(Zee Kryder) #8

To Tyler,

If I do 300 instead of 100 that’s one thing. but, 315 instead of 300? Not a ‘failure’. Sorry. But that’s wrong.

All this would be nought, if Zwift would give you the average watts for the segment.

Evaluating a 3 X 10 on Strava is easy, but 20 X 30 seconds? Impossible.

Help us out with this. I know it is very simple to add. It’s already on the ftp test.


(Gerrie Delport) #9

315 wont give you a fail, it think Zwift give you about  +10% both ways. so doing 330W instead of 300W will be a fail.

For me the difference between Z4 and Z3 is about 12%, so I could almost be in the next zone and still get the star. I think they are already very nice to us giving such a big margin. 


(David Mackenzie PACK SZR) #10

Shelly - as you increase the cadence you need to reduce the resistance to try and hit both targets.  Depending on your trainer that can be tricky.  If your trainer has erg mode then it should adjust automatically to keep you at the right wattage whatever your cadence is.


(Joe Daknis) #11

“When it changes segments is shows something like this “90-100 keep your cadence”.   But my Watts would be like 75, so when I get my cadence up, I get the red number and says power down.  What is more important to stay within the Watts or do what it says on the 90-100 cadence.  This is so confusing between cadence and watts.  Help please.”

 

Just to elaborate a little on what David said above… 

If you are using a ‘classic trainer’ (e.g. cycleops fluid2, mag trainer, etc) and overshooting your power target, then you need to downshift into an easier gear as you increase your cadence into the prescribed range.  From experience, I know that certain cadence/power targets can be very difficult to hit exactly because you won’t always have the ‘right’ gear available (i.e. you’ll have to spin a slightly higher gear at the low end of the cadence range or the next lower gear at the high end of the RPM range.) With time and some practice, you’ll learn which gears work best for a given power output and you’ll be able to jump back and forth easily as the intervals change w/o thinking too much about it.

 

If you have a controllable ‘smart’ trainer, it’s a very different scenario.  You don’t need to shift gears at all - because the trainer will do the work of varying resistance for you.  However, there’s always a bit of lag (how much depends on your specific trainer).  If you’re using one of these, do not worry about the ‘decrease power’ messages.  Just keep pedalling at your target cadence (RPM) and the trainer will reduce the resistance until your power is in line w/ the prescribed level for that interval.  

General points to remember: 

  1. In any given gear, power increases as your pedaling cadence increases. 

  2. If power is maintained at a constant level (smart trainer ERG mode), the resistance you feel increases as your cadence *decreases* and vice-versa.

i.e. The slower you pedal, the more work you have to do w/ each pedal stroke to put out the same number of watts.  This continues until you reach the point where you can no longer turn over the pedals (the oft-referred to ‘downward spiral of death’).

  1. ERG mode won’t allow you to produce significantly more or less watts than what is currently prescribed in your workout, but it can (and does) allow some drift that might cause you to fail a segment if you’re shifting gears or changing your cadence often.  The more you do these things, the more the trainer tries to adjust resistance up or down in an attempt to keep power constant.  In ERG, it’s best to quickly settle in at a comfortable cadence and stay there.   

 

Just keep riding and you’ll get a handle on these things soon enough!