Reporting riders after a race


(Madison Kelly) #1

Hello, I have a question for experienced Zwifters. So I did a Zwift race this morning and noticed a guy people would call a “flier” in our race. I’m new to Zwift though and at the time just thought he was really strong. Later when looking at results on Zwift and Zwiftpower.com, I noticed he actually pulled significantly less average watts than I did (and I’m a girl) but a higher watt/kg. Then I noticed he claims he weighs 85 pounds! How do I report this rider after the fact? I tried going back into Zwift an hour after the race and doing it on the mobile app but the option to report this rider wasn’t there. This was my first race on Zwift and it’s kind of a buzz kill to deal with cheaters as my first experience.

Is there a way to report someone after the race? Does the rider you want to report have to be online as well? Do you only have a short window to report someone, or have to report them while racing?


(Steve Ellis) #2

The person who placed one ahead is listed as a junior rider – maybe preteen. I wouldn’t necessarily say someone riding at an average 3.8 w/kg is a flyer – averaging 173 watts.


(Madison Kelly) #3

For sure, that’s why I didn’t think anything of it initially. But then his results say he’s 14 and weighs 85 lbs. that seems a bit light for a teenage male, don’t you think?


(Steve Ellis) #4

According to this growth chart from the CDC (pdf file) 39 kg is around the 40th percentile for a 12 year old male. And 152 cm is around the 60th percentile for height. 

And he registered an average of 173 watts on a smart trainer, and 193 bpm on the heart rate monitor. And he put out power more evenly than the other riders; more of a time trial effort than a crit race.

It’s possible that 173 watts, with smart drafting, will get a young, smaller rider somewhere in a flat race. There’s a lot of drafting available in Zwiftland these days, if you’re riding in the open multiplayer environment.

Watts per kilogram however is not as influential on the Watopia flat course; those with more power have a leg up on those who are lighter with less power.

I have no knowledge of the rider’s actual height or weight, but I don’t know that the numbers and performance are unbelievable. 193 average heart rate is high for me, certainly.

Others who know more may see these results and know whether they are credible. I don’t ride at an A level.


(Madison Kelly) #5

Yes but he’s 14, not 12. It’s definitely iffy. Especially with the high heart rate, he definitely put an effort in. But I find it hard to believe a 14 year old boy is that light. If he is he is seriously underweight. He may have been that weight a couple of years ago and hasn’t updated it in Zwift. As a 14 year old girl I was slim and outweigh him by 40 lbs. I just don’t find his weight believable. I believe he put out a hard effort but his weight is probably incorrect.

If it is correct than more power to him. I just don’t think it is.


(Steve Ellis) #6

I don’t have anything involved in this other than conversation. But I didn’t see where his age is identified. 


(Paul Allen) #7

Before this gets totally out of hand make sure you are following the forum guidelines: https://support.zwift.com/hc/en-us/community/posts/201078465-Community-Guidelines

Especially this part: Do not publicly accuse others of cheating or request that they be banned. If you suspect someone of cheating, submit a support ticket.

I have no dog in this fight.


(Madison Kelly) #8

Age and weight and all that was posted on results on zwift power. I just wanted to know what to do if I suspect someone of cheating in a race after the race is over. I did not and wouldn’t share the other person’s personal information. Just wanted to know what to do. Thanks for answering my question.


(Dom Boonen - VIETVELO) #9

Madison, how do we know that your weight on Zwift is correct? How do you feel if someone suspects that you are heavier than you claim?