Accurate sitting vs. standing

My Garmin head unit knows when I’m sitting in the saddle and when I’m standing. Zwift has access to the exact same information from my pedals. Wouldn’t it be nice if my avatar stood when I stood, rather than some made-up body position based solely on cadence?

I’m sure @Gerrie_Delport_ODZ will tell me that I’m supposed to stand when my avatar stands, and not the other way around! :wink:

LOL

I think it will be cool if Zwift could use that data. Since using my pedals I realized how much I stand. I do wonder if the pedals send that data or if it is calculated by the head unit.

Lol, I agree, I do hate it when I’m seated and powering up a climb and my avatar thinks I’m a fat Alberto Contador…

PS. out of interest, how does your Garmin know, and where can you see that?

Hi @Paul_Bonham

You can see it in the GC app. It is only available if you record using your Garmin head unit, activities from Zwift don’t get all that data, it’s a Garmin thing.

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See…

https://support.garmin.com/en-US/?faq=UV4ObLXDaE979tyrI6t0VA

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And doesn’t Garmin only get the information if you use a set of Vector pedals, or some other power meter that utilizes the ‘Cycling Dynamics’ application? I think this is required for the head unit to differentiate between sitting and standing, as this is calculated by determining at what point in the pedal stroke the rider is applying power, which is different when standing than when sitting.

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Ahh yes, seems you need some Garmin pedals to see this info.

Thanks all.

Favero Assioma pedals work as well.

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Currently, yes, you need power meter pedals to see reliable sitting/standing intervals.

It’s actually sometimes possible to see sitting/standing with other non-pedal power meters but (since they tend to transmit at a maximum of 4Hz) you need either a longer period of time standing or else the difference in crank torque has to be larger – that is, it’s hard to identify short intervals where you’re just standing for a second or two, and it’s hard to identify an interval where you’re standing but not putting much force into the pedals (which I sometimes do just for a few seconds to get a change in position).

Bottom line, it’s often possible to determine sitting/standing but for “accurate” sitting/standing you probably need either pedal power meters or else a power meter that transmits at high frequency.